California History Center

California History Center

Previous Courses

Past courses held at the California History Center.   

 

 

 

 

Spring 2007 Winter 2007 Fall 2006

 

      Spring 2006 Winter 2006 Fall 2005
Spring 2017  Winter 2017   Fall 2016   Spring 2005 Winter 2005 Fall 2004
Spring 2016 Winter 2016 Fall 2015   Spring 2004 Winter 2004 Fall 2003
Spring 2015 Winter 2015 Fall 2014   Spring 2003 Winter 2003 Fall 2002

Spring 2014

Winter 2014 Fall 2013   Spring 2002 Winter 2002 Fall 2001
Spring 2013 Winter 2013 Fall 2012   Spring 2001 Winter 2001 Fall 2000
Spring 2012 Winter 2012 Fall 2011   Spring 2000 Winter 2000 Fall 1999
Spring 2011 Winter 2011 Fall 2010   Spring 1999 Winter 1999 Fall 1998
Spring 2010 Winter 2010 Fall 2009   Spring 1998 Winter 1998 Fall 1997
Spring 2009 Winter 2009 Fall 2008   Spring 1997 Winter 1997 Fall 1996
Spring 2008 Winter 2008 Fall 2007   Spring 1996 Winter 1996  

 


 

 


 

Spring 2017

Intricacies of Urban Planning: San José

Course: HIST-053X-95, 2 units, CRN: 44862
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

The downtown area of the City of San José has been under continual redevelopment for well over a decade. Revitalization efforts have created a wide variety of discussions and debates about the historical, cultural and social significance of nearly all of San José’s downtown buildings. This course will examine the political, social and cultural debates surrounding a cross section of significant landmarks in downtown San José. This course is designed to foster a deeper understanding of San José’s past, the intricacies of long-term urban planning and the social and cultural communities that have developed and grown with the landmarks themselves.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Wednesday, May 10, 2017
     Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Field Studies: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM:
     9:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Saturday, May 13, 2017
     9:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Saturday, May 20, 2017

Mendez v Westminster School District

Course: HIST-055A-95, 2 units, CRN: 44863
Instructor: Nannette Regua

In 1947, the Mendez v. Westminster School District court case (Orange County, California) broke down legalized racial segregation and illuminated conditions of systematic racism and discrimination prevalent not only in California but the rest of the country. This important court case was a precursor to the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case that ended segregation in the United States.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:  
     Thursday, June 1, 2017
     Thursday, June 8, 2017
Field Studies:  9:00 AM - 5:00 PM:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, June 3, 2017
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, June 10, 2017

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Winter 2017

San José’s Japantown

Course: HIST-053X-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

San José's Japantown is now 126 years old and one of only three remaining authentic historic Japantowns in the United States. This course will examine the history of San José's Japantown with a particular focus on its residents, business developments, the arts and entertainment options. Students will explore this historic and vibrant community through two lectures and two hands-on field studies events that will take place in Japantown in San José.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Tuesday, February 28, 2017
     Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Field Studies: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM: 
     Saturday, March 4, 2017
     Saturday, March 11, 2017

Billy Ralston: The Man Who Built San Francisco

Course: HIST-051X-95
Instructor: Nannette Regua

Born in Ohio, William "Billy" Chapman Ralston (1826-1875) became the ultimate Californian; even more, the quintessential San Franciscan. After the California Gold Rush, Ralston wanted San Francisco to become a great financial center of the West. He established numerous businesses and institutions in San Francisco and the Bay Area.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Wednesday, February 1, 2017
     Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Field Studies: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM:
     Saturday, February 4, 2017
     Saturday, February 11, 2017

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Fall 2016

Arts and Entertainment of Silicon Valley

Course: HIST-107X-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

This course will emphasize the works and achievements of Californian communities who have helped develop Silicon Valley's arts and entertainment venues and industries, and explore how these groups and individuals nurtured the needs of a diverse population in this ever growing valley. From San Jose's first theater opening to the present museums, festivals and nightlife found in the valley, each venture has a story with significant people giving them life. Students will visit arts and entertainment venues and meet important community leaders, which will foster a deeper understanding of community art and entertainment histories, while also introducing students to current arts and entertainment options available in this diverse valley.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Wednesday, November 9, 2016
     Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, November 12, 2016
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, November 19, 2016

 

Redeveloping Downtown San José

Course: HIST-055C-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

The downtown area of the city of San Jose has been under continual redevelopment since the moment it was incorporated as a city of California. Recent revitalization efforts have created a wide variety of discussions and debates about the environmental impacts of expanding essential services for an ever growing population, while also examining the historical, cultural and social significance of nearly all of San Jose's downtown buildings. This course will examine the environmental, political, social and cultural debates surrounding a cross section of significant landmarks in downtown San Jose. This course is designed to foster a deeper understand of San Jose's past, the intricacies of long-term urban planning and the concept of balancing social and cultural communities, that have developed and grown with the landmarks themselves, with environmental and sustainability concerns. Students will see many of downtown San Jose’s landmarks in person and have a hands-on focused experience with these topics.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Wednesday, October 26, 2016
     Wednesday, November 2, 2016
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, October 29, 2016
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, November 5, 2016

 

The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Activism in the Bay Area

Course: HIST-055A-95
Instructor: Nannette Regua

During the late 1950s to the 1970s, the Civil Rights Movement united and inspired thousands of Americans throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and the United States. The Movement proved to be a vehicle through which courageous African Americans, Chicana/os, and many others resisted racial discrimination and demanded their civil rights.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Wednesday, October 12, 2016
     Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, October 15, 2016: San Jose
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, October 29, 2016: Oakland

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Spring 2016

 
Billy Ralston: The Man Who Built San Francisco

Course: HIST-054X-95, 2 units
Instructor: Nannette Regua

Born in Ohio, William Chapman Ralston became the ultimate Californian; even more the quintessential San Franciscan. As head of "Ralston's Ring"of investors, his aggressive initiatives were pivotal in funding the development of his beloved City and State.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, April 21, 2016
     Thursday, April 28, 2016
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 pm: Saturday, April 23, 2016: Belmont
     9:00 AM - 5:30 pm: Saturday, April 30, 2016: San Francisco

 

The Prideful City: San Francisco's Three World's Fairs

Course: HIST-053X-95, 2 units
Instructor: Nannette Regua

By reason of geography, climate, and great mineral wealth, San Francisco rose to prominence early as the "Instant City," indeed the only city in the entire West.  In 1894, 1915, and 1939-40 the City put on three ambitious World's Fairs to celebrate its increasing importance, recovery from devastation, and completion of its two famous bridges.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, May 19, 2016
     Thursday, June 2, 2016
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 pm: Saturday, May 21, 2016: Golden Gate Park, San Francisco
     9:00 AM - 5:30 pm: Saturday, June 4, 2016: Marina District, San Francisco

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Winter 2016

 
Living Legends: Restored Palaces of the Silver Screen

Course: HIST-053X-95, 2 units
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Movie theaters came to full glory in the 1920s and depression era 'thirties. They captured the hearts of American families everywhere, hence the prevalence of  grand examples restored and still operating in many communities across the country, including the San Francisco Bay Area.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, January 28, 2016
     Thursday, February 18, 2016
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, January 30, 2016: Paramount Theatre, Oakland
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, February 20, 2016: Stanford Theatre, Palo Alto


The History of the Stanford Area Communities

Course: HIST-051X-95, 2 units
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

When Leland and Jane Stanford founded the university the neighboring towns were Mayfield and Menlo Park.  Palo Alto was then established as University Park to be the university town.  From the beginning, all four entities have built close social, economic, and political connections to create a distinctive interaction over time.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, March 10, 2016
     Thursday, March 24, 2016
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, March 12, 2016: Stanford, Palo Alto
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, March 26, 2016: South Palo Alto, Menlo Park

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Fall 2015


 John Steinbeck's California: His Role and Influence

Course: HIST-055A-96
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath was inspired by the extreme social and economic disparities in the farm communities of California, especially for Dust Bowl and ethnic migrant workers. The young Steinbeck's sympathies were profoundly moved when he observed them close at hand both in the Salinas Valley, where he grew up, and in the San Joaquin Valley. He won both Pulitzer and Nobel Prizes for his powerful calls to remedy injustices among the under-represented poor.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 pm - 10:20 pm:
     Thursday, October 1, 2015
     Thursday, October 15, 2015
Field Studies:
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, October 3, 2015: Salinas
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, October 17, 2015: Monterey

New Almaden Quicksilver Mine - 19th and 20th Centuries

Course: HIST-055C-95
Instructor: Mary Jo Ignoffo

The New Almaden mine is the site of the first mercury deposit discovered on the American continent and has yielded metal of greater value than that of any other mine in the State, producing nearly one-third of the country's supply of mercury. Production at the mine fluctuated until 1927 when mining activity was terminated for the first time since 1849. Mining was resumed during World War II. The site became a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and part of Santa Clara County's park district in 1975. Quicksilver, as mined at New Almaden, was the chief reduction agent used in processing gold and silver, making it vital during California’s Gold Rush. This class will explore the mine’s activity, and the ethnicity of the miners who carried out the work during the 19th and 20th centuries. We will also evaluate environmental issues surrounding the mercury mine, and how those issues continue to be addressed. We will visit New Almaden’s wooden and adobe offices, mine structures and old furnace buildings, many dating from the 1850s, and walk the trails leading to many of the mine shafts.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 4:00 pm - 7:50 pm:
     Monday, October 5, 2015
     Monday, October 19, 2015
Field Studies:
     Saturday, October 10, 2015
     Friday, October 16, 2015

Creating and Fostering Inclusivity in California

Course: HIST-107X-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the passing of the Americans with Disabilities Act. In honor of this milestone of this historic legislation, this course will explore the many struggles, triumphs and community building efforts of concerned and dedicated Californians who have fought to make the communities in which we live more inclusive and accessible for all California citizens. These communities that have been created are powerful reminders of how citizens have fought and continue to fight for a truly inclusive world that includes all members of our society.

Lectures in Room: MLC110 (preferred due to handicap accessibility), 6:00 pm - 9:50 pm:
     Monday, November 2, 2015
     Monday, November 16, 2015
Field Studies:
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, November 14, 2015
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, November 21, 2015

Water: California's New Gold

Course: HIST-055B-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Water today is as scarce and precious, in its way, as gold and silver were in 19th century California, and far more essential to the 38 million people whose very lives depend on a daily supply. It is equally indispensable to the state's agriculture, largest in the nation, and to many other industries. Water is in constant need also by the flora and fauna of California's many ecologies. This critical shortage will be studied in the classroom and in the field.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 pm - 10:20 pm:
     Thursday, November 5, 2015
     Thursday, November 12, 2015
Field Studies:
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, November 7, 2015: San Jose sites
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, November 14, 2015: Los Gatos & Campbell

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Spring 2015

 
Rolling Thunder: Railroads Into California

Course: HIST-052X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

The transforming technology of the 19th century was steam, and steam powered the railroad into the Western wilderness, terminating in California. This true epic of the American experience brought permanent change to the economy and culture of the state. Over time, railroads became the dominant economic and political power in California, and comparably powerful in the entire nation.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, April 23, 2015
     Thursday, April 30, 2015
Field Studies:
     8:30 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, April 25, 2015: Sacramento
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, May 2, 2015: Felton

Arc of the Meteor: Jack London in California

Course: HIST-054X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

The quintessential man of action, gifted and generous, London was as much a participant in the great events of his time as he was a writer. Through energy and brilliance he climbed out of a rough youth to world prominence as a controversial voice for the American working man and woman.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, May 14, 2015
     Thursday, May 21, 2015
Field Studies:
     8:30 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, May 16, 2015: Glen Ellen
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, May 23, 2015: Carmel

Point Lobos to Silverado: The Stevensons in California

Course: HIST-053X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Robert Louis Stevenson traveled from Europe by ship and train to California in 1879 to court and marry Fanny Osbourne. His essays about the journey, and in California, have become a valued record of scenes, society, and the unspoiled Bay Region landscape in Victorian times. Biographers have further enriched this resource.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, January 29, 2015
     Thursday, February 12, 2015
Field Studies:
     8:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Saturday, January 31, 2015: Monterey sites
     8:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Saturday, February 14, 2015: Napa County sites

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Winter 2015

 
Architects of the Arts and Entertainment Industries in Silicon Valley

Course: HIST-054X-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

This course will emphasize the works and achievements of specific Californians who helped develop Silicon Valley's arts and entertainment venues and industries and explore how these individuals nurtured the needs of a diverse population of people in this ever growing valley. From San Jose's first theater opening to the present museums, festivals and nightlife found in the valley, each venture has a story with significant people giving them life.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Monday, February 2, 2015
     Monday, February 23, 2015
Field Studies:
     9:00 am - 6:00 pm: Saturday, February 7, 2015
     9:00 am - 6:00 pm: Saturday, February 28, 2015

Bay Area Earthquakes: Destruction and Renewal

Course: HIST-055C-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Earthquakes are constant in the Bay Area and California; at times enormously destructive, always hard to predict. The physical, social, and economic effects will be studied in classroom and in the field.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, March 5, 2015
     Thursday, March 19, 2015
Field Studies:
     8:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Saturday, March 7, 2015: USGS, Menlo Park
     8:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Saturday, March 21, 2015: San Francisco sites

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Fall 2014

 
John Steinbeck's California: His Role and Influence

Course: HIST-054X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Extreme social and economic disparities in the farm communities of California, especially for migrant workers, inspired the deep sympathies of John Steinbeck, who observed them at close hand in and around his native Salinas. He won both Pulitzer and Nobel Prizes for his powerful calls to remedy injustices among the under represented poor.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 pm - 10:20 pm:
     Thursday, October 2, 2014
     Thursday, October 16, 2014
Field Studies:
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, October 4, 2014: Salinas
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, October 18, 2014: Monterey

San Jose's Political Clout: an Historical Survey

Course: HIST-051X-95
Instructor: Mary Jo Ignoffo

The city of San Jose has played a role in the regional, state, and national politics. This class will explore political trends over time, and how local decisions have had an impact on the larger political stage. We will examine the motivations of political entities competing for influence during particular historical periods. We will analyze the tactics and viewpoints of the pivotal personalities who definitely influenced events and outcomes of specific political and diplomatic initiatives during various political movements.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 4:00 pm - 7:50 pm:
     Monday, October 6, 2014
     Monday, October 20, 2014
Field Studies:
     Saturday, October 11, 2014
     Friday, October 17, 2014

The Intricacies of Urban Planning: Culturally Significant Landmarks of Downtown and San Jose

Course: HIST-053X-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

The downtown area of the city of San Jose has been under continual redevelopment for well over a decade. Revitalization efforts have created a wide variety of discussions and debates about the historical, cultural and social significance of nearly all of San Jose's downtown buildings. This course will examine the political, social and cultural debates surrounding a cross section of significant landmarks in downtown San Jose. This course is designed to foster a deeper understand of San Jose's past, the intricacies of long-term urban planning and the social and cultural communities that have developed and grown with the landmarks themselves.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 pm - 10:20 pm:
     Monday, October 27, 2014
     Monday, November 3, 2014
Field Studies:
     9:00 am - 6:00 pm: Saturday, November 1, 2014
     9:00 am - 6:00 pm: Saturday, November 15, 2014

Agricultural Eden: Evolution of the West Valley

Course: HIST-107X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

The western districts of the Santa Clara Valley evolved from Amerind villages to Hispanic pasture lands, then to American wheat farms. These gave way to vineyards. Prune and other fruit orchards then took over, and a cannery industry developed. Mercury mining and the railroad enriched the area. Yet this economy has vanished completely. Students will study this evolution in classroom and field.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 pm - 10:20 pm:
     Thursday, November 6, 2014
     Thursday, November 13, 2014
Field Studies:
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, November 8, 2014: Los Gatos - Almaden
     9:00 am - 5:30 pm: Saturday, November 15, 2014: Saratoga - Campbell

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Spring 2014

 
Fortress to Park: The Presidio and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Course: HIST-052X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Founded before the City as protector of Mission San Francisco de Asis and other interests, the Presidio has been integral in the history of San Francisco. Through wise foresight it has been transformed into a unique National Park.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, April 24, 2014
     Thursday, May 8, 2014
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, April 26, 2014: San Francisco Presidio Sites
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, May 10, 2014: Golden Gate North Shore Sites

The Politics of Trade Unionism in California

Course: HIST-051X-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

This course will examine the politics of trade unionism in California, with a particular emphasis on Bay Area union activities.  Despite a lack of strong union activity in the tech industry that has made its home in the Bay Area, unions were and, in many cases, still are strong political entities in the Bay Area and throughout the rest of California.  We will examine a wide variety of unions in this course, including their activism, internal political struggles and influences on local, state and federal governments.  Topics include, but are not limited to, government employee unions, agricultural unions and music industry unions.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Monday, April 28, 2014
     Monday, May 12, 2014
Field Studies:
     8:30 AM - 5:30 PM: Friday, May 2, 2014
     8:30 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, May 17, 2014

Saving San Francisco Bay: Politics and Environment

Course: HIST-107X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Key to the California water system, the San Francisco Bay estuary system is ceaselessly in motion, river and ocean mingling to support myriad life in its waters.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Thursday, May 22, 2014
     Thursday, June 5, 2014
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, May 24, 2014: Alviso, Don Edwards Wildlife Preserve
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, June 7, 2014: Fremont,  Bay Interpretation Center

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Winter 2014

 
Sword and Cross: Spain Settles Alta California

Course: HIST-052X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

The presence of covetous foreign nations in Pacific waters moved Spain in 1769 to settle Alta California, overcoming much hardship to establish, eventually,  twenty-one missions and four presidios in the territory.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:00 PM:
     Thursday, January 23, 2014
     Thursday, February 6, 2014
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, January 25, 2014: Mission Santa Clara; De Saisset Museum
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, February 8, 2014: Mission San Jose, San Jose Living Museum


Gold Rush Politics

Course: HIST-051X-95
Instructor: Mary Jo Ignoffo

To examine California’s first Constitution drafted in 1849 at a convention in Monterey, with particular attention to the delegates -- Californios, New Englanders, Southerners, Chileans, British and German -- who gathered to create a new government in California. The proceedings were transcribed in both English and Spanish because not all delegates spoke English. The Constitution that came out of the convention implemented both American and Mexican law, and became the basis of government in California for the next thirty years.

This class will also analyze the gathering in San José of California’s first Legislature of 1849-1850. Why was San José chosen as the capitial, and how did it lose that status? An additional objective seeks to relate the historic debates at the first convention to similar questions that citizens of California confront today.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 4:00 PM - 7:50 PM:
     Monday, January 27, 2014
     Monday, February 10, 2014
Field Studies:
     Friday, January 31, 2014
     Saturday, February 8, 2014

Architects of the Arts and Entertainment Industries in Silicon Valley

Course: HIST-054X-95
Instructor: Crystal Hupp

Silicon Valley is certainly known for its technological innovations, but rarely attracts much attention for its diverse arts and entertainment history.  This course will emphasize the works and achievements of specific Californians who helped develop Silicon Valley’s arts and entertainment venues and industries and explore how these individuals nurtured the needs of a diverse population of people in this ever growing valley.  From San Jose’s first theater opening to the present museums, festivals and nightlife found in the valley, each venture has a story with significant people giving them life.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:20 PM:
     Monday, February 3, 2014
     Monday, February 24, 2014
Field Studies:
     8:30 AM - 5:30 PM: Friday, February 7, 2014
     8:30 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, March 8, 2014


Early Airports and Pioneer Flyers of the Bay Area

Course: HIST-053X-95
Instructor: Chatham Forbes, Sr

Excellent flying weather and strategic location made California a thriving center of early airports and record-setting pioneer flyers. The class will visit key sites in the history of Bay Area flight.

Lectures in Room: CHC, 6:30 PM - 10:00 PM:
     Thursday, February 27, 2014
     Thursday, March 20, 2014
Field Studies:
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, March 1, 2014: San Carlos Airport, Hiller Aviation Museum
     9:00 AM - 5:30 PM: Saturday, March 22, 2014: Oakland Airport, Oakland Airport Museum,  Air Traffic Control Center

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California History Center
Building: CHC
Contact: Tom Izu
Phone: 408.864.8986
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Last Updated: 9/13/17